Governor Throckmorton practiced law in the building that is now home to rye.  As we learn more about him, we will add it to this page.  If you know of anyone who might be able to provide us with photos of him or his family, please contact us at info@ryemckinney.com.

Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

James Webb Throckmorton served as governor of Texas from August 9, 1866 to August 8, 1867. The son of a physician, James Throckmorton was born in Tennessee in 1825. As a boy he moved to Arkansas in 1836, then to Fannin County, Texas in 1841, and again to Collin County. In 1844, he left the Rangers to study medicine in Kentucky with his uncle. He served as an army surgeon in the Mexican War, but received a medical discharge. Disliking the practice of medicine, he turned to law and politics. After five years each as a state representative and state senator, he was elected a delegate to the Secession Convention of 1861, where he numbered among the seven who voted against secession. Although a Unionist, he joined the Confederate army when war came, and eventually served as brigadier general in charge of troops guarding the Texas frontier, and Confederate commissioner to the Indians.

After acting as president of the Constitutional Convention of 1866, Throckmorton defeated E.M. Pease in the race for governor, taking office in August 1866. When presidential reconstruction gave way to congressional reconstruction in March 1867, Throckmorton and the U.S. military differed: he disagreed with their deployment of troops in the interior rather than on the frontier of the state, and they accused him of failing to punish crimes against blacks and Unionists. In July, General Philip Sheridan removed Throckmorton from the governorship as "an impediment to reconstruction." E.M. Pease was appointed in his place. After fighting against radicalism in the early 1870s, Throckmorton was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives (1874-1888), where he argued among other things for government encouragement of and government regulation of railroads. He ran for governor twice more, in 1878 and 1890 before he died in McKinney on April 21, 1894.  If you'd like more information about Gov. Throckmorton, check out Claude Elliott's book, Leathercoat: The Life History of a Texas Patriot , published in 1938.

Rumor has it that back in the day, breaking the finger off of this statue was quite common.  Time after time, the city would replace the finger.  If you happen to have a Throckmorton finger, we'd love to display it at rye.

Rumor has it that back in the day, breaking the finger off of this statue was quite common.  Time after time, the city would replace the finger.  If you happen to have a Throckmorton finger, we'd love to display it at rye.

Mrs. Throckmorton.  The family resided in Anna, Texas where Mrs. Throckmorton's family lived.

Mrs. Throckmorton.  The family resided in Anna, Texas where Mrs. Throckmorton's family lived.